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faq

What is Spirometry?

Who is eligible to participate in the STICS study?

What happens during the STICS study?

How many children will take part in the STICS study?

Why is the STICS study being conducted?

Why should my child participate in the STICS study?

What is exhaled nitric oxide?

Are there any costs or benefits to participating in the STICS study?

What is a methacholine challenge test?

What is Spirometry?

Spirometry is a test that measures the amount of air blown out of the lungs and how fast it comes out. During the test, your child will wear a nose clip, take a big breath in and then blow out all their air hard and fast into a machine called a spirometer. You child will be asked to blow into the spirometer several times. This test tells us how well your child’s lungs are working and will be done at each visit.

Who is eligible to participate in the STICS study?

We are actively recruiting for this study!  If you would like to learn more please contact the study team at 1-866-913-8477 or by email at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Your child may be eligible to participate your child:

• is 5-11 years old
• takes an everyday controller medication for their asthma or recently had asthma symptoms
• had at least one course of oral steroids for asthma symptoms in the last year

What happens during the STICS study?

Most people with asthma use an action plan to guide their asthma treatment. Written asthma action plans are usually color-coded. “Green” means that asthma symptoms are well controlled. “Yellow” means that asthma symptoms are not well controlled and asthma treatment may need to change. “Red” means a severe worsening of symptoms. Red zone treatment is usually an oral corticosteroid like prednisone.

Participants will take an inhaled corticosteroid (Fluticasone), 2 puffs twice a day while asthma symptoms are in the green zone, and will be randomly assigned to one of two yellow zone treatments which are:

1. Continue the same dose of daily corticosteroid treatment for 7 days

2. Increase the daily corticosteroid dose for 7 days

There will be 8 visits to our research center and 6 telephone calls over 1 year. Participants will receive asthma tests and asthma medications at no charge.

How many children will take part in the STICS study?

UCSF is one of 9 clinical research centers in the country doing this study. A total of about 250 children will be in this study nationwide. At least 25 children will be included in the study at UCSF.

Why is the STICS study being conducted?

The purpose of this study is to improve the asthma guidelines primary care doctors use when treating asthma in children. The study aim is to find the best action plan strategy for children with asthma during asthma flare ups. Finding the best treatment strategy may prevent symptoms from increasing to a severe exacerbation requiring oral corticosteroids, like prednisone. The study is also trying to determine which treatment strategy leads to the least total corticosteroid (oral and inhaled) use for children with asthma.

We are studying whether in children receiving low-dose daily controller medication for their asthma, stepping up that therapy when a child begins to have an asthma flare-up will reduce the likelihood of a severe asthma exacerbation.

Why should my child participate in the STICS study?

Your child’s asthma may or may not improve while in this study. However, the results of this study will help doctors learn more about personalizing asthma treatment in the future. We will give you information about asthma and about staying away from asthma triggers. Your child will receive care from asthma physicians, asthma tests, and medications at no cost. Your child’s participation could help others with asthma.

What is exhaled nitric oxide?

The amount of nitric oxide in your breath is thought to increase when the lungs are irritated or inflamed. You will be asked to slowly blow into a mouthpiece attached to a machine that measures nitric oxide.

Are there any costs or benefits to participating in the STICS study?

There are no costs to participate in the STICS study. All study medications will be provided at no charge. Your child will have breathing tests and advice from study doctors who are asthma experts. Your child’s participation will help the medical community understand better ways to treat people with asthma using personalized treatment plans. You will gain satisfaction knowing that your participation could help others with asthma.  There will be study compensation (up to $600 if you complete the entire study).

What is a methacholine challenge test?

Methacholine is a medication that can cause narrowing of the airways of the lung. During a methacholine challenge, participants breathe in gradually increasing doses of methacholine. Spirometry will be performed after each dose of methacholine. The test will stop once spirometry show your airways narrow by 20% or you have been given the last dose. You may have mild asthma symptoms during this test. You will receive albuterol to make these symptoms go away.