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faq

What is Spirometry?

What is Albuterol reversibility in BARD?

Why should my child participate in the BARD study?

What is a methacholine challenge test?

Are there any costs or benefits to participating in the BARD study?

Who is eligible to participate in the BARD study?

What happens during the BARD study?

Why is the BARD study being conducted?

How many children will take part in the BARD study?

What is sputum induction?

What is Spirometry?

Spirometry is a test that measures the amount of air blown out of the lungs and how fast it comes out. During the test, your child will wear a nose clip, take a big breath in and then blow out all their air hard and fast into a machine called a spirometer. You child will be asked to blow into the spirometer several times. This test tells us how well your child’s lungs are working and will be done at each visit.

What is Albuterol reversibility in BARD?

This test measures improvement in your child’s breathing. Your child will perform spirometry, take 4 puffs of albuterol, and repeat spirometry 15 minutes later. It will be done 5 times during the study to see if the study treatments change your child’s results.

Why should my child participate in the BARD study?

Your child’s asthma may or may not improve while in this study. However, the results of this study will help doctors learn more about treating children with asthma in the future. We will give you information about asthma and about staying away from asthma triggers. Your child will receive care from asthma physicians. Your child’s participation could help others with asthma.

What is a methacholine challenge test?

Methacholine is a medication that can cause narrowing of the airways of the lung. During a methacholine challenge, participants breathe in gradually increasing doses of methacholine. Spirometry will be performed after each dose of methacholine. The test will stop once spirometry show your airways narrow by 20% or you have been given the last dose. You may have mild asthma symptoms during this test. You will receive albuterol to make these symptoms go away.

Are there any costs or benefits to participating in the BARD study?

There are no costs to participate in the BARD study. All study medications will be provided at no charge. You will have breathing tests and advice from study doctors who are asthma experts. You will help the medical community understand better ways to treat people with asthma using personalized treatment plans. You will gain satisfaction knowing that your participation could help others with asthma.  There will be study compensation (up to $1368 if you complete the entire study).

Who is eligible to participate in the BARD study?

We are actively recruiting for this study!  If you would like to learn more please contact the study team at 1-866-913-8477 or by email at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Your child may be eligible to participate if he or she:

• is 5-17 years old
• has asthma symptoms despite asthma treatment.
• of African American/Black ancestry (have at least one African American/Black grandparent)

What happens during the BARD study?

Study participation will last up to 16 months.  During this time there will be 15-18 visits to our research center and 10 brief telephone calls.  Study visits will include asthma tests, study medications, and blood/urine tests at no charge. Participants will be taught how to recognize worsening asthma symptoms though a personalized asthma action plan.

If your child is enrolled in the study, they will stop taking their regular asthma medication and receive the four different study treatments in random order:

1. Combined low dose fluticasone plus salmeterol
2. Low dose fluticasone alone
3. Combined medium dose fluticasone plus salmeterol
4. Medium dose fluticasone alone

Why is the BARD study being conducted?

The purpose of this study is to find the best asthma treatment to add for African American/Black children who have asthma that is not well controlled on a low dose of inhaled steroid. We are comparing four different treatments for asthma. This study will also try to find out if African American/Black adults and children differ in how they respond to the medications used in this study.

How many children will take part in the BARD study?

As many as 1000 people across the nation may need to be screened so that 494 can take part in the study. Up to 50 children may take part at the UCSF partnership.

What is sputum induction?

This screening procedure tells us which cells are in your airway. You will receive 4 puffs of albuterol before this procedure to open your airways. You will be asked to breathe in a salty mist for up to 12 minutes. Every two minutes you will be asked to cough deeply and vigorously in order to bring up a sample of sputum (mucus from your airway).